Posts Tagged ‘politics’

Masterclass: Craft of Comedy Entertainment | Bafta

7 October 2017

I’m part of the panel for a Bafta event:

A panel of comedy entertainment producers and writers discuss the recent renaissance in entertainment television, covering programme development, writing, casting, and the role of satire.

  • 6:45pm, Tuesday, 17 October 2017
  • Princess Anne Theatre, Bafta, 195 Piccadilly, St. James’s, London W1J 9EU
  • Tickets
  • Updated with image by @widowedanthem

Alternative Election Night | Channel 4

5 June 2017

Undated handout photo issued by Channel 4 of David Mitchell and veteran BBC interrogator Jeremy Paxman who will be hosting Channel 4's Alternative Election Night

I have been enjoying working on Channel 4’s Alternative Election Night:

Jeremy Paxman, David Mitchell and Richard Osman present an all-night feast of comedy and comment in Channel 4’s very different take on election night

Nigel Farage Gets His Life Back | BBC2

25 August 2016

Nigel Farage Kevin Bishop

Kevin Bishop is Nigel Farage, in a programme imagining his life after resigning. Blurb:

“On the 23rd June, Britain voted to leave the European Union,” added the BBC. “Then, on the 4th July, Nigel Farage, the man who had made it all possible, resigned saying he wanted his life back. But what sort of life has he gone back to, and how does a man forever in the spotlight fill his days now he has nothing to do?”

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Charlie Brooker’s Election Wipe | BBC2

30 April 2015

I am a proud member of Team Election Wipe, the fruits of whose labours will be broadcast shortly before the polls open.

Ary Barroso’s Aquarela do Brasil for BBC News

25 June 2014
060812football.JPG

A piece for the BBC News Magazine about Aquarela do Brasil:

One rainy night in 1939, he wrote the opening lines of Aquarela do Brasil (Watercolour of Brazil): “Brasil, meu Brasil brasileiro.” This translates as “Brazil, my Brazilian Brazil”. Never have four words been more Brazilian, before or since.

The censors had issues with some colloquialisms and a folksy reference to tambourines, but Barroso persuaded them that his “samba exaltacao” was modern and patriotic enough to meet their exacting requirements.

I thoroughly enjoyed Misha Glenny’s radio documentary The Making of Brazil, Bryan McCann’s book Hello, Hello Brazil: Popular Music in the Making of Modern Brazil and Scott L. Baugh’s reference work Latino American Cinema: An Encyclopedia of Movies, Stars, Concepts, and Trends. I am indebted; they are recommended.

My favourite versions:

And here’s that Disney, and Ze Carioca alive and well in 2014: